Paid Only For Hours Scheduled but Not Paid for Hours Worked?


Time Worked vs Time ScheduledEmployees should be paid for all hours worked. What we see from time to time are employers who try to save on their expenses by only paying for hours scheduled, rather than actual hours worked. For example, if an employee arrives at work and starts working 15 minutes before the scheduled start time, the employer is not allowed to accept the benefit of that work but not pay the employee for the time.

Similarly, if an employee continues working beyond the scheduled end of their shift, the employer must pay for the additional time worked. Some employers have policies that require employees to arrive 10 minutes before their scheduled start time so that they are in their seat ready to get started at the scheduled shift time.  If an employer has a policy about arrival time, then such time arrived is when the time clock should start, not when the actual shift begins.

Be aware of time tracking policies where you may be asked to simply note your shift hours rather than the precise time you start and stop work. To the extent you are working more time than you can record, or to the extent your employer adjusts your records to only reflect your shift hours rather than all hours actually worked, call the Shavitz Law Group.   We can seek back-pay for time worked within the past 3 years under federal law and longer under certain state laws. Contact Shavitz Law Group at (561) 447-8888 or visit us at www.shavitzlaw.com for a free, no obligation review of your circumstances and consultation regarding your rights.

You Earned It, Now Let’s Go Get It.

Gregg Shavitz, Shavitz Law Group, 951 Yamato Rd Ste 285, Boca Raton, FL and 830 3rd Ave, Floor 5, New York, NY.  Lawyers licensed in states including FL, NY, NJ, and TX.  The choice of a lawyer is an important decision and should not be based on advertisements alone.

 

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